Category Archives: latvian

Rauga pankūkas (Latvian Yeast Pancakes)

Breakfast

Periodically, I post a recipe from Latviešu ēdieni by Ņina Masiļune.

Yeast pancakes, or rauga pankūkas as they’re known in Latvian, are similar to regular pancakes, except for two important differences: first, in place of baking powder, yeast is used, and second, no fat is used in the batter at all. While you can put this together the morning you wish to have it, we found that involved getting up too early, so after allowing the pancakes to rise for 90 minutes, we put it in the fridge overnight. The results are a fluffy, beautifully thick pancake with great flavor, perfect with preserves or maple syrup.Breakfast

Periodically, I post a recipe from Latviešu ēdieni by Ņina Masiļune.

Yeast pancakes, or rauga pankūkas as they’re known in Latvian, are similar to regular pancakes, except for two important differences: first, in place of baking powder, yeast is used, and second, no fat is used in the batter at all. While you can put this together the morning you wish to have it, we found that involved getting up too early, so after allowing the pancakes to rise for 90 minutes, we put it in the fridge overnight. The results are a fluffy, beautifully thick pancake with great flavor, perfect with preserves or maple syrup.

Posted in breakfast, latvian, recipes, untranslated | 4 Comments

Thoughts on Pelmeņi

Boiled Pelmeņi with Vegetables

For my birthday today, I wanted to talk about one of my favorite Latvian foods: pelmeņi. I’ve always loved dumplings of all sorts, especially potstickers and gyoza which have been the source of many a great meal for me over the years. These aren’t very different – simply a different mix of ingredients. They’re not natively Latvian – pelmeņi are a very popular Russian (and previously Soviet) “fast food” and are found all over Eastern Europe. Then again, pelmeņi are related to ravioli, gyoza and wontons – every country and culture seems to have their own twist on stuffed pasta.Boiled Pelmeņi with Vegetables

For my birthday today, I wanted to talk about one of my favorite Latvian foods: pelmeņi. I’ve always loved dumplings of all sorts, especially potstickers and gyoza which have been the source of many a great meal for me over the years. These aren’t very different – simply a different mix of ingredients. They’re not natively Latvian – pelmeņi are a very popular Russian (and previously Soviet) “fast food” and are found all over Eastern Europe. Then again, pelmeņi are related to ravioli, gyoza and wontons – every country and culture seems to have their own twist on stuffed pasta.

Posted in ground meat, latvian, recipes, russian, untranslated | 2 Comments

Šķovēti kāposti (Braised Sauerkraut)

Šķovēti kāposti

When it came time to discuss what we would be having for our Christmas dinner, my husband knew immediately that he wanted šķovēti kāposti, which is braised sauerkraut. I couldn’t remember if I had had it at any of the restaurants or at my mother-in-law’s house, so I was a little unsure of just what would happen to sauerkraut when cooked for a long time.

As it turns out, it becomes really, really good.Šķovēti kāposti

When it came time to discuss what we would be having for our Christmas dinner, my husband knew immediately that he wanted šķovēti kāposti, which is braised sauerkraut. I couldn’t remember if I had had it at any of the restaurants or at my mother-in-law’s house, so I was a little unsure of just what would happen to sauerkraut when cooked for a long time.

As it turns out, it becomes really, really good.

Posted in dairy-free, gluten-free, latvian, recipes, side, untranslated, vegan, vegetable, vegetarian | 3 Comments

Merry Christmas! Priecīgus Ziemassvētkus!

Pelēkie zirņi (Grey Peas)

Our Christmas meal consisted of pelēkie zirņi ar sīpoliem un speķi (grey peas with bacon and onions), speķa rauši (Latvian bacon and onion rolls), a spiral-sliced ham, šķovēti kāposti (braised sauerkraut), apple cobbler and mulled wine. (Mmm.. mulling spices + inexpensive merlot.. Wonderful.)

On Wednesday, I told you that we’d been waiting all year for one special dish. These, my friend, are pelēkie zirņi. Grey peas. This is also the last of our supply we brought with us from Latvia and, unfortunately, will be the last until we go back.Pelēkie zirņi (Grey Peas)

Our Christmas meal consisted of pelēkie zirņi ar sīpoliem un speķi (grey peas with bacon and onions), speķa rauši (Latvian bacon and onion rolls), a spiral-sliced ham, šķovēti kāposti (braised sauerkraut), apple cobbler and mulled wine. (Mmm.. mulling spices + inexpensive merlot.. Wonderful.)

On Wednesday, I told you that we’d been waiting all year for one special dish. These, my friend, are pelēkie zirņi. Grey peas. This is also the last of our supply we brought with us from Latvia and, unfortunately, will be the last until we go back.

Posted in dairy-free, gluten-free, holidays, latvian, pork, side, untranslated, vegetable | 7 Comments

Happy Anniversary to us!

Yesterday was my husband and I’s 1st anniversary. We’d been discussing what we should do for a few months, floated the idea of going to our tiny town’s new fancy restaurant, Sostanza, and mused over our options.

In the end, we decided to stay home and cook a multi-course meal of some of our favorite dishes. Yesterday was my husband and I’s 1st anniversary. We’d been discussing what we should do for a few months, floated the idea of going to our tiny town’s new fancy restaurant, Sostanza, and mused over our options.

In the end, we decided to stay home and cook a multi-course meal of some of our favorite dishes.

Posted in bread, latvian, meal planning, recipes, untranslated | Leave a comment

Ramen Salad

Ramen Salad

You see, there is a very popular salad called “cheese salad” that this mimics for far cheaper. (Personally, I prefer ramen salad to cheese salad, in large part due to the texture of the noodles.)

I tried a bite, not really expecting to like it, but I was pleasantly surprised. It was really good, in that broke-food kind of way. (Satisfying, cheap and extremely unpretentious, much like grabbing fries from McDonald’s when you’re having cravings.)

It may sound weird, but really, trust me. It’s good. It’s also an extremely cheap, filling side (or, in a pinch, a full meal) but not really low-cal. Quite frankly, it’s “Bachelor Chow.”Ramen Salad

You see, there is a very popular salad called “cheese salad” that this mimics for far cheaper. (Personally, I prefer ramen salad to cheese salad, in large part due to the texture of the noodles.)

I tried a bite, not really expecting to like it, but I was pleasantly surprised. It was really good, in that broke-food kind of way. (Satisfying, cheap and extremely unpretentious, much like grabbing fries from McDonald’s when you’re having cravings.)

It may sound weird, but really, trust me. It’s good. It’s also an extremely cheap, filling side (or, in a pinch, a full meal) but not really low-cal. Quite frankly, it’s “Bachelor Chow.”

Posted in latvian, one-dish, recipes, salad, side, snack | 2 Comments

Rutku-burkānu salāti (Daikon-Carrot Salad)

Rutku-burkānu salāti (Daikon-Carrot Salad)

Some weeks, it’s difficult to decide on a recipe from Latviešu ēdieni. Many of the recipes are very difficult to source affordable ingredients for where we live, primarily herring and other fish dishes. And considering how often herring is used in Latvian cooking, that’s a lot of recipes. Luckily, there are a lot of veggie-heavy salads that we can make for a quick and easy side for our meals.

This salad is creamy yet crisp and goes well with beef and pork.Rutku-burkānu salāti (Daikon-Carrot Salad)

Some weeks, it’s difficult to decide on a recipe from Latviešu ēdieni. Many of the recipes are very difficult to source affordable ingredients for where we live, primarily herring and other fish dishes. And considering how often herring is used in Latvian cooking, that’s a lot of recipes. Luckily, there are a lot of veggie-heavy salads that we can make for a quick and easy side for our meals.

This salad is creamy yet crisp and goes well with beef and pork.

Posted in latvian, recipes, salad, untranslated, vegetable | 7 Comments