Monthly Archives: February 2010

Nam Manglak – Thai Basil Seed Drink

Nam Manglak

My mom found a packet of basil seeds and decided to challenge me to figure out what to do with them. After some research, I found that the primary use was in a drink called “nam manglak” and that the little seeds would poof up into what seemed rather like tapioca pearls or frog eggs.

They’re awfully fun to nibble on and will poof into small chewy spheres. It seems to take them about 30 minutes to completely soak up all of the water and poof completely, but they start poofing after just a few seconds. Nam Manglak

My mom found a packet of basil seeds and decided to challenge me to figure out what to do with them. After some research, I found that the primary use was in a drink called “nam manglak” and that the little seeds would poof up into what seemed rather like tapioca pearls or frog eggs.

They’re awfully fun to nibble on and will poof into small chewy spheres. It seems to take them about 30 minutes to completely soak up all of the water and poof completely, but they start poofing after just a few seconds.

Posted in asian, dairy-free, drinks, gluten-free, recipes, untranslated | 1 Comment

Creamy Cabbage and Carrot Soup

Cabbage is one of those much-maligned veggies that are incredibly cheap and very filling. If you’re living frugally, like we are, having a few great cabbage recipes in your repertoire is a very good thing. We made the entire recipe for about a dollar, possibly less. It’s also incredibly easy to make vegan or vegetarian – simply omit the cream for vegans and make sure you use vegetable broth.

Posted in american, dairy-free, gluten-free, one-dish, recipes, soup, untranslated, vegan, vegetable, vegetarian | Leave a comment

Ratio: Variations on the Theme of Pancakes IV

Ratio IV - Farinata/Cecina Pancakes

Part 4 of the Ratio Challenges Series

For instance, the recipe below came about while I was thinking up potential flours and ways to play around with the pancake ratio and my old experiments with chickpea flour and savory flatbreads came to mind.

I’ve learned (thanks to Wikipedia) that creating a batter out of this particular blend of chickpea flour, water, olive oil and rosemary is known by several names in the Mediterranean, including farinata, socca and cecina. Ratio IV - Farinata/Cecina Pancakes

Part 4 of the Ratio Challenges Series

For instance, the recipe below came about while I was thinking up potential flours and ways to play around with the pancake ratio and my old experiments with chickpea flour and savory flatbreads came to mind.

I’ve learned (thanks to Wikipedia) that creating a batter out of this particular blend of chickpea flour, water, olive oil and rosemary is known by several names in the Mediterranean, including farinata, socca and cecina.

Posted in american, dairy-free, gluten-free, italian, Ratio, recipes, untranslated | Leave a comment

Ratio: Variations on the Theme of Pancakes III

Third in the Ratio: Pancakes series.

No picture of this one and why is that? Because I managed to have so many problems putting this together, it’s not even funny. It came out tasty in the end but quite frankly, I need to test my recipe revision to find out if it’s really fixed.

In the end, they came out pretty well. Even the first one that spread like crazy and was a bitch to flip tasted great. I hit the cocoa measurement dead-on. They were extremely delicious and I only wished I’d had some fresh strawberries and whipped cream to top them.Third in the Ratio: Pancakes series.

No picture of this one and why is that? Because I managed to have so many problems putting this together, it’s not even funny. It came out tasty in the end but quite frankly, I need to test my recipe revision to find out if it’s really fixed.

In the end, they came out pretty well. Even the first one that spread like crazy and was a bitch to flip tasted great. I hit the cocoa measurement dead-on. They were extremely delicious and I only wished I’d had some fresh strawberries and whipped cream to top them.

Posted in american, cakes, Ratio, recipes, untranslated | 2 Comments

Open-faced Burgers with Mushrooms and Onions

Open-Faced Burgers with Mushrooms and Onions

When we were at Winco earlier this month, I found a great deal on some marbled pork shoulder that would be great to grind up for sausages or meatballs. Since I was grinding meat that evening anyway, I decided to make open-faced burgers.

These came out juicy and packed with flavor. I loved the mushrooms and onions cooked in red wine!

Posted in american, dairy-free, gluten-free, ground meat, pork, recipes, untranslated | Leave a comment

Asian Pear Spinach Salad with Maple-Cider Vinaigrette

Asian Pear Spinach Salad

They say, “Necessity is the mother of Invention.”

We had planned to have a spinach salad with all sorts of goodies, including some asian pears we picked up on sale. It had to be fast and incorporate very few ingredients, preferably all staples that we still had in the pantry. My husband found this one on MyRecipes.com and it worked out beautifully. It’s well-balanced between sweet and tart, pairing up well with the sweet asian pears and the bite of red onions.

Posted in american, dairy-free, gluten-free, recipes, salad, untranslated | 2 Comments

Homemade Pizza – Garlic Lovers’ Extravaganza

Garlic Lovers' Extravaganza Pizza

Now, this crust takes 24 hours to make, so you can’t just start on it a few hours before dinner, but it does make for a very easy crust recipe. It’s just about as easy as those pizza crust mixes in boxes at the store — but it tastes a hell of a lot better. We’re both really happy with how this crust came out – nicely fluffy without being too thick (similar to a hand-tossed crust at one of the major pizza joints), with good texture and excellent flavor, thanks to the long, slow rise.Garlic Lovers' Extravaganza Pizza

Now, this crust takes 24 hours to make, so you can’t just start on it a few hours before dinner, but it does make for a very easy crust recipe. It’s just about as easy as those pizza crust mixes in boxes at the store — but it tastes a hell of a lot better. We’re both really happy with how this crust came out – nicely fluffy without being too thick (similar to a hand-tossed crust at one of the major pizza joints), with good texture and excellent flavor, thanks to the long, slow rise.

Posted in american, italian, recipes, untranslated | 2 Comments