Monthly Archives: November 2009

Sveicieni Latvijas dzimšanas dienā! (91st Anniversary of Latvian Independence)Sveicieni Latvijas dzimšanas dienā!

Latvian Independence Day Cake

I thought about what I wanted to do for the holiday and eventually came up with this cake. In the South, red velvet cake is a tradition. I’ve never made it, much less had it, but I knew it’d give me the deep maroon of Latvia’s flag. The white was a little trickier.

I found a recipe for a Silver-White Cake in my Good Housekeeping cookbook. It used no egg yolks so that the cake would come out white as snow and after some fiddling, I had adjusted the recipe so I would get some white and some red velvet out of it. It came out beautifully, the colors perfect.

I think my little Latvian Independence Cake came out well. My husband liked the flavor too — tangy and not-too-sweet.Latvian Independence Day Cake

I thought about what I wanted to do for the holiday and eventually came up with this cake. In the South, red velvet cake is a tradition. I’ve never made it, much less had it, but I knew it’d give me the deep maroon of Latvia’s flag. The white was a little trickier.

I found a recipe for a Silver-White Cake in my Good Housekeeping cookbook. It used no egg yolks so that the cake would come out white as snow and after some fiddling, I had adjusted the recipe so I would get some white and some red velvet out of it. It came out beautifully, the colors perfect.

I think my little Latvian Independence Cake came out well. My husband liked the flavor too — tangy and not-too-sweet.

Posted in cakes, holidays, Latvia | Leave a comment

Ramen Salad

Ramen Salad

You see, there is a very popular salad called “cheese salad” that this mimics for far cheaper. (Personally, I prefer ramen salad to cheese salad, in large part due to the texture of the noodles.)

I tried a bite, not really expecting to like it, but I was pleasantly surprised. It was really good, in that broke-food kind of way. (Satisfying, cheap and extremely unpretentious, much like grabbing fries from McDonald’s when you’re having cravings.)

It may sound weird, but really, trust me. It’s good. It’s also an extremely cheap, filling side (or, in a pinch, a full meal) but not really low-cal. Quite frankly, it’s “Bachelor Chow.”Ramen Salad

You see, there is a very popular salad called “cheese salad” that this mimics for far cheaper. (Personally, I prefer ramen salad to cheese salad, in large part due to the texture of the noodles.)

I tried a bite, not really expecting to like it, but I was pleasantly surprised. It was really good, in that broke-food kind of way. (Satisfying, cheap and extremely unpretentious, much like grabbing fries from McDonald’s when you’re having cravings.)

It may sound weird, but really, trust me. It’s good. It’s also an extremely cheap, filling side (or, in a pinch, a full meal) but not really low-cal. Quite frankly, it’s “Bachelor Chow.”

Posted in latvian, one-dish, recipes, salad, side, snack | 2 Comments

Rutku-burkānu salāti (Daikon-Carrot Salad)

Rutku-burkānu salāti (Daikon-Carrot Salad)

Some weeks, it’s difficult to decide on a recipe from Latviešu ēdieni. Many of the recipes are very difficult to source affordable ingredients for where we live, primarily herring and other fish dishes. And considering how often herring is used in Latvian cooking, that’s a lot of recipes. Luckily, there are a lot of veggie-heavy salads that we can make for a quick and easy side for our meals.

This salad is creamy yet crisp and goes well with beef and pork.Rutku-burkānu salāti (Daikon-Carrot Salad)

Some weeks, it’s difficult to decide on a recipe from Latviešu ēdieni. Many of the recipes are very difficult to source affordable ingredients for where we live, primarily herring and other fish dishes. And considering how often herring is used in Latvian cooking, that’s a lot of recipes. Luckily, there are a lot of veggie-heavy salads that we can make for a quick and easy side for our meals.

This salad is creamy yet crisp and goes well with beef and pork.

Posted in latvian, recipes, salad, untranslated, vegetable | 7 Comments

Mashed Plantains with Leek

Mashed Plantains with Leek

Every so often, our favorite local store carries plantains, the banana’s larger, starchy cousin. My husband, who was in awe of the banana prices when he came over, looked at them and wondered how they were. When we went to the new Winco in Salt Lake, they had a pretty good price on them, so we picked up a couple to make a savory, non-potato-based mash. Mashed Plantains with Leek

Every so often, our favorite local store carries plantains, the banana’s larger, starchy cousin. My husband, who was in awe of the banana prices when he came over, looked at them and wondered how they were. When we went to the new Winco in Salt Lake, they had a pretty good price on them, so we picked up a couple to make a savory, non-potato-based mash.

Posted in american, recipes, side, untranslated, vegetable, vegetarian | Leave a comment

Leftovers: Salmon Cakes on Schwarzbrot with Garlic Sauce

Salmon Cake on Black Bread

Last Friday, I posted about making Easy Salmon Cakes. I made two too many — which isn’t enough for another dinner, but just enough for a lunch.

Believe me, those salmon cakes on a thick slice of dark, black bread with a schmear of garlic sauce are divine. I’d rather have them this way, in an open-faced sandwich, than as a main with some other starch on the side. Salmon Cake on Black Bread

Last Friday, I posted about making Easy Salmon Cakes. I made two too many — which isn’t enough for another dinner, but just enough for a lunch.

Believe me, those salmon cakes on a thick slice of dark, black bread with a schmear of garlic sauce are divine. I’d rather have them this way, in an open-faced sandwich, than as a main with some other starch on the side.

Posted in american, recipes, sauce, seafood, snack, untranslated | Leave a comment

Easy Salmon Cakes

The first time I bought a can of wild Alaskan pink salmon, I thought I was supposed to remove the bones and skin, just like a regular fillet of fish. It took me almost an hour to manage it and I was so frustrated by the end of it that after I made salmon cakes, I swore up and down that I would never buy canned salmon again.

The moral of this story is: Don’t be afraid of tinned fish. You don’t have to de-bone, just dump it in a bowl and mash it up. Within seconds, it’ll look just like tuna.The first time I bought a can of wild Alaskan pink salmon, I thought I was supposed to remove the bones and skin, just like a regular fillet of fish. It took me almost an hour to manage it and I was so frustrated by the end of it that after I made salmon cakes, I swore up and down that I would never buy canned salmon again.

The moral of this story is: Don’t be afraid of tinned fish. You don’t have to de-bone, just dump it in a bowl and mash it up. Within seconds, it’ll look just like tuna.

Posted in american, recipes, seafood, untranslated | 3 Comments

Rutabaga Mash

Rutabaga Mash

I feel sorry for the lonely rutabagas sitting on the shelf at my grocer. No one ever seems to buy them, as evidenced by the checkers’ bewildered query, “turnip?” when I pick up a few for the week. They’re surprisingly good, usually fairly cheap and a good replacement for potatoes. Plus, they contain less than half the calories of a similarly sized potato. Rutabaga Mash

I feel sorry for the lonely rutabagas sitting on the shelf at my grocer. No one ever seems to buy them, as evidenced by the checkers’ bewildered query, “turnip?” when I pick up a few for the week. They’re surprisingly good, usually fairly cheap and a good replacement for potatoes. Plus, they contain less than half the calories of a similarly sized potato.

Posted in american, one-dish, recipes, side, untranslated, vegetable, vegetarian | 2 Comments